About kimberlypham520

My life goal is to have my tweets published.. or to be a professional voice actor.

Check Out Beautificasian!

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Check Out Beautificasian!

Beautificasian is a critical blog that centers on the standards of beauty in America and Asia and how Asian American and Asian women are undergoing body modifications in order to adhere to the pressures of acculturation and/or assimilation. For the purposes of this blog we will define body modifications as any measures taken to alter one’s appearance which can include things such as plastic surgery, cosmetics, and eyelid tape. Our main focus questions why Asian American and Asian women find the need to alter their bodies simply to “fit in” and what means are they taking to do so. These days, societal expectations pressures Asian American and Asian women to conform to the “white” ideals of beauty (big eyes, double eyelids, high cheek bones, etc). This, in turn, causes many Asian American and Asian women to endure rigorous processes, such as applying a plethora amount of makeup, placing scotch tape on their eyelids and even submitting to plastic surgery, in order to achieve the hegemonic idea that “white” is beautiful.

Our blog as three authors, Meha, Sarah and Kimberly, all from different cultural backgrounds, this therefore consists of varying opinions and personal experiences from three different female perspectives. For example, a member of our group is guilty of attempting these “body modifications” and has even thought about getting plastic surgery to achieve this “ideal beauty.” As female Americans, we have all experienced the pressures of beautifying oneself in order to live up to society’s expectations. Thus, each of us can relate to this issue and contribute our own personal inputs.

Catching The Yellow Fever

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Wong Fu Productions is one of the most popular Asian American filmmakers/artists on the web. With over 1,700,000 subscribers to date, their success is attributed to their first short film, “Yellow Fever.”

Initially released in 2006, “Yellow Fever” follows a young Asian American college student, Phil Wang, as he questions why “all the white guys are taking our girls.” Phil is the only one passionately curious and fascinated with “what do white guys have that Asian guys do not,” while his fellow Asian male friends appear more indifferent and nonchalant about this issue. Phil makes it his quest to figure why white guys would go for Asian girls and why Asian guys would never go for white girls (or could never) in hopes of finding a girl for himself (“maybe even a white girl.”) A friend of Phil suggests that Asian girls are mesmerized by and attracted to the white male’s masculine and rugged qualities -something that Asian men do not have, such as a big butt and body hair. Phil then goes to his white friend, Andrew for advice on getting a woman’s attention. Andrew gives Phil poor tips such as how Asian women love it when white men say “Ni hao ma” in a poor accent. Phil replies that that technique could only work one way. Andrew also shows Phil how he can simply point and at an Asian girl, give her a “look,” move his fingers in a “come hither” motion and she will come running. The film’s popularity is due to its usage of humor, sound effects, identification with the main character and incorporation of memorable scenes, (For example: the scene where the Asian women are attracted to the simple act of the white male character spreading peanut butter on a slice of bread.) Although their commentary reveals that Wong Fu Productions never meant for this video to make any type of social commentary, Wong Fu productions and “Yellow Fever” gave a comedic spin on the questions of present day miscegenation between Asians and Whites.

As Lisa Nakamura states, Asian Americans are the Internet’s most active users. YouTube is effective and influential for Asian Americans due to its ability to “recast Asian Americans as the powerusers of cyberspace.” In a technological age where cameras and editing programs are easily accessible, Asian Americans are taking part in self-identification while destabilizing the notions of essentialism and Asian authenticity through YouTube videos. By taking the perspective of an Asian American male character interested in finding a companion, “Yellow Fever” reveals that Asian Americans are falsely represented as the “model minority.” The film also resists the ideals of the sexless, nerdy Asian male and raises questions about the mainstream definition of masculinity. Does having body hair and a big butt make you more masculine than others? Hmm…

BeautificAsian

We, Meha, Kimberly and Sarah, will be working on a critical blog that centers on the standards of beauty in America and how Asian American women are undergoing body modifications in order to adhere to the pressures of acculturation. Our main focus questions why Asian American women find the need to alter their bodies simply to “fit in” and what means are they taking to do so. These days, societal expectations pressures Asian American women to conform to the “white” ideals of beauty (big eyes, double eyelids, high cheek bones, etc). This, in turn, causes many Asian American women to endure rigorous processes, such as applying a plethora amount of makeup, placing scotch tape on their eyelids and even submitting to plastic surgery, in order to achieve the hegemonic idea that “white” is beautiful.

By having three authors, all from three different cultural backgrounds, our blog will consist of varying opinions and personal experiences from three different female perspectives. For example, a member of our group is guilty of attempting these “body modifications” and has even thought about getting plastic surgery to achieve this “ideal beauty.” As female Americans, we have all experienced the pressures of beautifying oneself in order to live up to society’s expectations. Thus, each of us can relate to this issue and contribute our own personal inputs. We will post approximately three to four blogs each – however, we are not limited to this quota. Additionally, we will occasionally post dialogue and discussions between the three of us as our research continues throughout the quarter.

Our research will begin with the history of the standards of beauty for Asian American women, which includes the desire for fair skin and small feet. In addition, we will also touch on America’s expectations on how an Asian American woman should look like- petite and sexual, similar to the Dragon Lady. For contemporary issues, we will elaborate on the hype to gain “white” physical features. We will utilize YouTube makeup tutorials, especially those made by Asian American beauty gurus, to discuss the alteration of physical features using makeup. We will also elaborate on the new eyelid surgery trend, which many Asian American women are getting in order to gain the appearance of larger looking eyes. This is simply a preview of upcoming attractions for we will continue to do more research and expand from what we already have. Check out our blog soon!

Here is our working bibliography.

Critical Blog Calling!

Hi everyone!

As Dr. Anne mentioned in class on Wednesday, I am thinking about working on a blog for the final project focusing on the idea of Asian American women beauty. If any of y’all are interested, please reply to this post and we can exchange contact information or meet after class on Monday to further discuss the project!

Best,
Kimberly 

Hello AsAm118 :3

Hello everyone! My name is Kimberly Pham and I am currently a third year Economics/Accounting major. I am a very busy person and this summer is no exception. I currently intern for the Santa Barbara County Auditor-Controller’s Office in the Financial Accounting and Customer Support (FACS) Division, which basically means I work on “Accounts Payable.” On top of that, I am also an Economics tutor for CLAS, where I teach Econ 3A (Financial Accounting) as well as tutor students in lower-division Economics courses. In order to not be completely suffocated with Accounting/Economics, I am minoring in Asian American Studies. I took ASAM1 during my first quarter at UCSB and LOVED it, which is why I decided to pursue this minor. If y’all are reading this intro and thinking, “Gosh all she does is talk about school,” y’all are definitely and completely WRONG. Aside from my studies, I do enjoy little, girly things, such as make up, shoes, clothes, fashion, etc… Which leads me to my favorite form of Asian American pop culture – Asian American Youtube Beauty Gurus. An example of such would be: MichellePhan, Jen aka Frmheadtotoe, Hollyanneree, That’sHeart and BubzBeauty.

Pop culture is something that is consumed by the masses- which does not mean it is always liked by those who consume it. Pop culture can be a crowd favorite, a guilty pleasure or something that everyone HATES but just cannot stop talking about. An example of an unusual form of pop culture would be Kim Kardashian and Kanye West’s baby- irrelevant celebrity gossip that we all just love to hate!

Asian American pop culture is different depending on who is in charge of the piece. An example of non-Asian-American-made pop culture would be Harold and Kumar, Asian characters who are portrayed as emasculated, un-athletic, weak, scrawny and of course, model minorities. However, these days, with the usage of technology and social media,  Asian Americans are resisting against these stereotypes portrayed by the media through YouTube and their own videos. An example of such would be Wong Fu Productions or Ryan Higa- young Asian American YouTube stars who use their acting and editing talents to give their representations of the “real” Asian American experience.

Thus, studying ethnic pop culture enables us to understand how and why an ethnic group is represented the way they are and what actions are these ethnic-minority groups taking in order to break down these false representations.